Uncategorized

How to Make a Chair Slipcover ~ Part 2 and an Update…

Okay, so what looks so easy to do ~
all those lovely dropcloth chairs you see
on Pinterest all lovely and stenciled
and looking like original
grain sacks…


After printing the wording in Microsoft Word, then the fun with cutting the stencil began.

There is a huge reason WHY you pay
a small fortune for those stencils
and for chair slipcovers with stencils
already on them.
They are really hard to hand cut!

But I’m getting ahead of myself.
😉

I love the dropcloth slipcovers I have seen
with stencils you can buy premade from
Maison de Stencils
but I was thinking to myself
that I want something original…
Blithely I thought, “I can make my own.”
I’m a DIYer and designer so…
why not??

Part 2 ~ Chair Slipcovers’ Stenciling

Gather all your supplies:
stencil pouncing brush
painter’s tape
paint that will work on pre-washed
and dried fabric
precut stencils with words,
numbers, and pictures.
{unless you’re crazy like me to make your own!}

Begin by figuring out how large your piece of fabric
needs to be for each chair back, and it’s layout
with words and other stencils on your fabric.

Find the vertical centers of the top and bottom
of your fabric and dry iron a light guideline into it.

Tape off lines to paint with painter’s tape then with
your stencil brush pounce paint down the open lines.  
Be careful with the paint as it’s easy to accidentally
get paint on the fabric where you don’t want it.
{ask me HOW I know this…}

I decided on an Anita’s Deep Denim blue (308066)
and Black (11002) and used a little of the black
mixed into the blue to get an even deeper blue.





Traditional grain sacks had blue, black, 
red, green or brown writing on them.  
Choose whichever colors you like 
for your project.
Pink for a young girl’s birthday party
would be awfully fun!!!
🙂

Let dry overnight per some sites I read, 
or until dry to the touch.
I was able to sew my fabric late in the day
after about six hours after the lines were
pounced with paint.
I really used a light amount of paint with each
application, but I went over each section
a few times to deepen the color with paint.


Here you can see I was still deciding whether I wanted the year in the middle or underneath.

Adding the Stencils and Transfers

Mostly why I didn’t get these slips done earlier
in the week was because I was creating the wording
in Microsoft Word
{these are 120 point German font}
and then I found a bee and wreath I liked
on the internet and copied it to my computer.

Hubby helped me move the picture into
Photoshop where I was able to add the 2014
***which MUST BE MIRROR IMAGED to print correctly
when ironed on fabric.***
into the space just inside the mouth
of the wreath.
This was printed onto transfer paper.

Iron on any fabric transfers using a dry iron
{remove all water from the iron first by dumping out.}
according to manufacturer’s instructions.

That’s it for today because I’m still deciding on
how I want the chair backs to look on their backs.
This is my original design but I’m not sure
if it will work with these chairs as
they have oval insets…

To see more, check out Part 1.

So… I’ll noodle this and play around with
chair tops a little more.
🙂

To see more dropcloth ideas, please 
check out my friend
Debra Pashowsky’s blog ~ Shoppe No. 5
of which an older post of mine
Sofa Slipcovers
was graciously included!


Next time I should have the reveal and
I’ll tell you what is written on each chair’s front.

Sharing with
Wow Us Wednesday ~ Savvy Southern Style
Share Your Style ~ The Red Painted Cottage
Friday at the Fire Station ~ A Fireman’s Wife
Blogger’s Pitstop ~ This Autoimmune Life
Home Matters ~ Life With Lorelai
Create Bake Grow Gather ~ Shabby Art Boutique
Blogging Fifty
Inspire Me Monday ~ Create with Joy
Feathered Nest Friday ~ French Country Cottage
The Really Crafty Link Party ~ Keeping It Real

Happy Sewing,
Uncategorized

How to Make a Flirty Chair Skirt ~ Part 1

Flirty skirts… We all like wearing those cute swingy skirts
when we are young and sometimes we even
like wearing short flirty skirts when we get
a little bit older.
😉

But, today I’m sharing about how to
make a fun and flirty chair 
slipcover skirt!


Me ripping the dropcloth fabric horizontally to make the skirting.
Cutting off my own head aside…
Making a dropcloth chair cover skirt
is a pretty easy project!


Figuring out fabric layout

The dropcloth used for this project is a
9′ x 12′  dropcloth, 8-oz. deniér
{thickness of the cloth}
although dropcloths come in 5′ x 5′ very lightweight
and a heavier 10-oz. weight in various sizes.
Use the presewn edges in your design ~
this saves time in sewing and pressing.

Work on the skirting first, since this will be the first piece
cut out of the dropcloth.

Fabric is made up of warp and weft threads. 
The warp are the longitudinal up and down threads.
The weft are the horizontal or sideways threads.
Since dropcloths are made up of different cloth selvages
sewn together, use the pre-sewn top and bottom
parts of the “rectangle” for your skirting.

Figure out how long you’d like your skirting.
Mark with a pin.
{I used the chair itself as a guide ~ roughly 1/3 of the length of the height
up to the top of the chair seat.}

If you would like a ruffle around your seamline
then add 2 1/4″ {or more} ~ for turning under 1/4″
and another 1″ down for a roughly 3/4″ ruffle
once finally sewn in.

Cut your fabric including the extra mentioned above
for the seam allowance and ruffle, if desired.


Tip #1~ Ripping the Fabric

You can cut the skirting all the way across
marking each side and intervals all the way across
to keep the line straight as you cut, but it’s easier to
cut the thick turned edge and cut just slightly
into the fabric and then rip quickly
across the fabric!*

Ripping the fabric is an old quilting and sewing trick that
works best in cotton-based fabrics.
It makes perfectly square pieces of fabric once the
first edge is ripped.

Sometimes you’ll buy a shirt or pants or a skirt
that was cut slightly “off” and you may not know
WHY you don’t like
wearing that item of clothing
but chances are the fabric wasn’t cut perfectly 
right to begin with.
This is where the ripping trick eliminates
that fabric torsion.
{my term for that phenomena!}
*I tested the first skirt and checked the two sides and they were within a 1/4″ of being equal in length.
Not an issue as the two sides won’t be sewn together and will be sewn onto opposite sides of the
chair seat top.  If you think whatever you are creating may be really affected by uneven weave,
then rip a small piece off the bottom to create your “even edge,” then measure to the length you need
and rip the final piece, adding in for needed turning of a new seam.  🙂
This shows the vertical length I decided upon.  The pin actually shows where I’m planning to run my seam line
{at the pin line and across}.  Don’t be afraid to pin right into your chair’s fabric and padding to help hold your
fabric as you are designing!  🙂  Unless the cover is leather, most woven fabrics won’t be harmed by this.

Making the Seat Pattern

Patterns can be made using anything ~ newsprint
and parchment paper work best.
On newspaper, you can draw lines easily with a marker.

With regular kitchen parchment paper
it’s opaque so you can see what is underneath.
It doesn’t tape together well so you may
want to pin it when combining several pieces
together on big projects.
{or use packing tape, which works better}
Big sewing and craft stores also sell
wider parchment paper.
Lay out your parchment on top of your seat and 
draw around where you want your seam to be.

Make slits in the pattern for the upper chair’s
back posts and push the pattern back enough
to create the back seam {plus selvage}.
When actually cutting the fabric, leave extra fabric
around the edges for surrounding the posts are cut ~
these will become the 1/2″ lengths for finishing those edges.

Draw across the back piece for skirting
across the back of the chair, if desired.

Make a tuck at each front corner ~ open up when actually cutting out fabric pieces.  The final seam line is shown.

Here’s the actual cutting line, sewing line and pleat opened up.

Lay out your seat piece on the remaining dropcloth fabric

cutting out as many seat pieces as needed.
Keep the middle of the seat pattern
{as if you are facing the chair’s seat from the front}
centered on one vertical thread
of the dropcloth.

A vertical line can be drawn through 
the middle of the pattern piece 
if needed to assist with this.

If you are new to sewing, stay as close to
the fabric’s selvage edge when pinning
and cutting to conserve the middle of 
the fabric for future projects.

***Next week in Part 2, I’ll be making
a top for the chair back!***

This photo just shows the pre-sewn edge and bottom of the original fabric (middle piece) from the fabric’s wrong side.

Sewing Seams

Sew all of your seams turning under a 1/4″ then
once again along each side seam and
any other seams as needed.

Sew 1/8″ to 1/4″ from the turned down upper
seam of the skirting pieces.  
This will also become your sewing line and 
point of reference for pinning to the seat top.


Tip #2 ~ Making Perfect Seams

I used to sew turned down edges from the wrong side of 
the fabric but I’ve found that if evenly sewn seams on the
right side is what is wanted, sewing from the 
right side of the fabric is the way to go.
🙂

This also helps with uneven bobbin tension
and bobbin “globs” of extra thread
that often happen.
{hides those infernal things on the fabric’s wrong side}
Line up the turned seam using the guides on
the machines feed dog plate on one measurment
as you sew.

*I also like to use a finger on my right hand underneath 
along the lower turned edge as a guide, too.
This alerts me as to when I might come to a section that is shallower or uneven than all the rest so that small movements
can be made during this topstitching to “catch” the 
underneath edge into the seam.
This is where sewing from the front comes in handy!
😉


Attach outer edges of skirt to very back of chair seat with pins. Pin roughly 1/3 of the fabric length to each front corner,
then begin splitting by halves and pin until fully pinned.

Gathering the Skirt and Sewing

On thin fabrics like lightweight cottons, the old way of
sewing two rows of very loose threads along
each piece’s seam selvage works well.
{lengthen your stitch length to 4 or above and sew at 1/2″ and 3/8″ from a piece’s edge}
The bobbin thread of both rows would then be pulled, gathered
and arranged over the adjoining fabric piece, and finally sewn with a permanent regular-length stitch over top.

This is pretty time consuming and doesn’t work
with thick fabrics like dropcloth canvas or
blue jeans or upholstery weight materials.

so…

It’s done by dividing in half, over and over
until all the fabric sections are pinned
in place.

The photograph above shows pulling the fabric
straight out finding “the middle” of this section.


This “center” is now pinned to the eyeballed
“middle” of this open section.
Put your pins in vertically instead of
horizontally
btw.
😉

This photo shows the skirting fabric being
pulled out slightly more than 1/3 of
the total fabric to put a little more
on each side than infront.

Once fully pinned on, stand back and eyeball
whether the “seam line” will be level.
Adjust up or down in areas as necessary.
A Pinterest worthy image.
🙂

Sew the skirt and final edges

Sew along your already topstitched line
catching in the seat top’s fabric
underneath.

The pleats on the front corners can be
pre-sewn or you can just do it in
with this seam as you go.
Totally up to your comfort level
sewing multiple steps
at a time!
😉

Turn down twice the edges around
the chair legs and sew making
a 3-sides box.

Sew on the back piece of the skirt to the chair seat piece’s
back area separately from the rest of the skirting.
This skirt edge will always be put on
separately and will hide any fabric closures
added later to hold the chair 
slipcover in place.

That’s it folks for the end of Part 1!
***Next week in Part 2, I’ll be making
a top for the chair backs!***
Looking for that perfect stencil now…


I put a small video out on
Instagram
yesterday and another out on my
YouTube channel
sharing how to sew and pin the skirt and
some of these things in more detail.
They are first attempt videos and I know there are filming boo-boos
but thought I’d share anyway. XD!

I’d love it if you’d check
those out and subscribe to my feeds!
Thank you.

Past dropcloth project I worked on:
Sofa Slipcovers
Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4 ~ Ruching
Settee Cover Reveal

Sharing with
Sweet Inspiration ~ The Boondocks Blog
Friday at the Firestation ~ A Fireman’s Wife
Friendship Friday ~ Create with Joy
Home Matters ~ Life with Lorelai

See you next time!
🙂
Uncategorized

Just a Quick Post…

Just a quick post…
Was really under the weather yesterday so I
got NOTHING done so doing double time
today!  🙂  

I’ve been wanting to make some pretty
drop cloth slipcovers for these two
chairs here in our Prairie Home
for a little while now.
I saw a cute idea over at a favorite store
{I’ll share that place when I post the final post tomorrow or Friday}
 and that gave me an idea!
Skirted dining room chair cover with tiebacks and rosette ~ front to be a little tank top!
So here’s the beginnings of a 
flirty little dining room chair cover
I just designed…
Sharing with:
Tuesdays with a Twist ~ Stone Cottage Adventures
Feathered Nest Friday ~ French Country Cottage
Friday Features ~ Oh, My Heartsie Girl!

That’s all for now, folks!
😉
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Sunday Sentiments ~ Scripture Quilts and a "How To"

Happy Sunday evening to you!
I thought I’d share a little on
something new I found recently:
scripture quilts

This photo is a bit over-lightened but I need to lighten to share this quilt
as this room is a bit dark.

When I first visited my friend Peggy
we took a tour around her lovely home
decorated with family antiques 
and wonderful vintage 
family photos and also these 
soft and sentimental scripture quilts
she had sewn.

A friend of hers had made some and Peggy
had seen them and asked if she could
get a pattern to make 
some scripture blocks.
These first squares ended up being the
beginnings of three quilts
she has made for her husband
and adult children.
More are on the way, too.
😉


I love how this room is decorated with many lifetimes of passed-down family heirlooms ~ taken with my old iPhone 5.
Quilts blocks based on biblical stories have been 
made since women began making quilts
however
these more modern scripture quilts with
scripture quotes written in a
family members’ handwriting are
a relatively new idea.

I saved a number of biblical and scripture pieces out onto my 
Pinterest Faith board
if you’d like to stop by there
and take a look.

Love the tea dyed quilt block to match the variegated cottons prints used for the rest of the quilt.  This quilt was
presented to Peggy’s husband Tony for his birthday one year.


These quilts are a nice way to keep family members
close especially when everyone lives are so busy
and many of us live far away
from our family
and hardly have time to get together
much except during the holidays.
These quilts also a wonderful way to remember
family member who has “gone on home.


A fun idea is to have each family member
write out their favorite scripture verse
and sign his or her name along the
bottom edge above where
the seamline would be.
This could be a great thing to do over
Thanksgiving while the turkey is cooking
or at a family summer BBQ.
A station to set up in your backyard while
everyone is together celebrating.
Also, this idea could be easily adapted to 
other types of handwritten quilts.
Be sure to sign your quilt when it is done
and this separate quilt block
looks lovely placed on the
back of a quilt.


Drawn “square” is the “cut out block.”  The center horizontal and vertical
axes are drawn first.


How to make a Scripture Quilt Block

Supplies needed

*parchment paper
*pencil
*ruler or straight edge
*markers to draw over pencil lines
*permanent marker in black or favorite color

to use for final handwritten block.
*muslin washed and dried ~ cut to size of final
quilt block(s) plus seam allowance.


Instructions

*Begin with cut squares from parchment paper

in the size you need for your quilt block
plus 1/2″ around all four sides 
for the seam allowance.
Also cut out actual muslin

*On your computer, type out your scripture verse(s).

*Print the verse onto regular computer paper
large enough with roughly 3/4″ intervals
between each drawn line.
{leaving about 1/2″ of open space between lines of words}



*Adjust your printing and reprint as needed
making the spacing to 
your liking.

I used 1″ spacing on the photos above and that 

was too much, so I re-drew the lines 
to half-inch spacing.That worked better.

3/4″ I think is what the ones which
Peggy made were measured.  
When you create your own scripture quilt blocks, 

play around with the computer font sizes.  
The above printout would need to be re-spaced on 
the computer accordingly.
{see how it doesn’t quite fit?}
This is just a template anyway and your
handwriting can be adjusted
as you create each scripture block.
Play around with each one until each
looks right to you.

For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith — and this is not from ourselves it is a gift from God —(9) not by
works, so that no one can boast.  ~ Ephesians 2: 8-9

Instructions continued

*Place the typed paper underneath the parchment
paper that has had center lines drawn
horizontally and vertically on them.

*Draw as many horizontal lines
above and below the first centered line ~
enough for your whole scripture quote.


*Align the typed sheet underneath
the parchment paper
adjusting the centers of each line
until it looks centered.
Tape down both papers as needed.

*Write out your verses in a dark marker
on the parchment.


*Lay out your thin muslin
over top.
If available, use a light board or projector
underneath to light the words.

If that’s not available?
 Press down firmly
on the muslin to make the marker
show through for copying.

***Practice writing out your verses
on a scrap of muslin first using 
fine-point permanent marker.
😉


Sew your scripture quilt blocks
together with other lightweight cotton
strips to create your quilt in whatever
design you’ve chosen.
Oh, and don’t forget to sign your
beautiful quilt by placing
a special quilt block with a heart-felt 
message on the back.
Enjoy!

Blessings to you,
Barb 🙂



Sharing with
A Life in Balance
Inspire Me Monday ~ Create with Joy
Monday Social ~ My Heart Lives Here
Thinking Outside the Pot ~ Family Joy Link Up Party
Dishing It and Digging It ~ Rustic and Refined
Vintage Charm ~ Blue Willow House

I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me.
Philippians 4:13 🙂


For more information about
Biblical quilts
please click here.
🙂

Uncategorized

Sunday Double Header ~ Welcome Banner using Recycled Blue Jeans

 
 
Part 2 of today’s Sunday Double Header is all about reuse, recycle, and repurposing several pairs of worn out blue jeans into a fun Welcome BannerThis sign can be used indoors or outdoors to welcome friends and family to your home.  
 
Placed above a doorway, over a window {as I’ve used it here}, or hung outside between two trees or on a barn or house wall, this adorable and easy to make Welcome Banner is a perfect way to invite friends into your home for any occasion.
 

 

Here’s how to make it:
 
 
 

 

Recycled Blue Jeans Welcome Sign Banner
 
* Gather several pairs of old ripped blue jeans.  Cut out the pockets
leaving a small edging {about 1/8”}, if desired.  Save the little watch
pockets, too, to use on your project or for another, smaller sign.
 
* Figure out what word you want on your sign or for however many
pockets you have available.  Cut out letters from scraps of 
leftover fabrics to make your “word.”  
“Home” or “Hope” or “Love” would be really cute options and 
something I am thinking of creating 
vertically later on and
hung from bows of jute and ribbon.
 
* Sew, hotglue or use iron-on, double-sided Pellon 
to put letters on each pocket.  
Do the same with any embellishments or other fabrics you have
 
            making your Blue Jean Banner unique to you!
 
*Hotglue or sew on ribbon, jute or other string to create a way to hang
            your banner.

 
 
shot with my iPhone ~ a little blurry, sorry!

 

 
Laying out the letters and balancing
the look…









Hang up and enjoy! 
 
A simple and easy craft to make that only took an afternoon to create.  I decided to totally sew mine using a quilting stitch on my sewing machine but you can put your together with hot glue or a Pellon-type iron-on fabric.
 
{if machine stitching:  turn down your stitch length to 1/2 ~ from the normal length; turn down the width of the stitching to about ½ on the zigzag stitch, adjust as you sew}.

The new Thriftshop Maiden
approving the layout…
from Post #1 today.

 

 

 
This blue jeans banner could be taken apart at a later date and new pockets created to reuse the pieces for a bridal shower or a wedding sign, for a baby shower banner, or as a name plate outside a college student’s dorm room ~ really anywhere. 
 
The possibilities for repurposing old jean pockets into a banner are many ~ let your imagination run wild!
 
 
Now we are ready for a party!
Happy Sunday afternoon
Barb 🙂
 
 
 

 
 
 
Sharing with
Snickerdoodle Create Bake Make Link Party ~ 
My Husband Has Too Many Hobbies
Friday at the Fire Station ~ A Fireman’s Wife
 
Create Link Inspire ~
 

 

Happy Sunday afternoon,
Barb 🙂

Uncategorized

Crafts to Make ~ French Toile de Jouy Dog Bed Cover

Yoda testing out his new bed cover last night after it was just completed!  He approved! 

With the tiniest hint of fall 
in the early morning air
and 
grocery stores beginning to put out their 
fall produce for sale 
along with all of the seasonal 
berry pies 
This year’s crop of gourds and pumpkins
should be coming in just around the corner…
With this, I’m feeling
energized and ready 
for a little fall cleaning
plus I’m feeling a little
sewing bug coming on!

My “sewing table”
I’ve have a list of simple projects
I want to get done for our
Tiny House this fall 
and 
one of these projects includes something for
our little dog 
Yoda.

Laying out the fabric over the current insert ~ rough-measuring leaving an inch over beyond each edge for the seam allowance ~ past the sides’ midpoints ~ where the top and bottom are sewed together.


Yoda’s dog bed has been
in need of some 
TLC
for quite some time…

We found his dog bed
about ten years ago at

Target
when we first picked him up from the
Animal Friends of the Valley 
Animal Shelter
in Lake Elsinore ~
not too far from
where we were
living in our Big House.

Yoda snoozing during our trip across country this summer.

The main body
is still holding up
and
 I haven’t found anything like this
with which to replace it
so…
I thought I’d make him a new padded inside piece
to sleep on
as the current one is flat and bunching up
when washed… a lot…

But first I wanted to make
the cute outside cover
and
I’m heading back to my
French Ethereal roots
using this really pretty
100% cotton dusky aquamarine blue
toile de jouy fabric 
I found recently while browsing the
craft section at
Wal-Mart.


Just like eating your favorite dessert 
before dinner ~
it’s loads more fun to make
the finished cover first!
And I will go back later and make
a new insert with muslin and new stuffing,
but for now
I had to make this cover!
I am loving this fabric!!!
Oo la la!


Here you can see how I draped the fabric 
over the insert and didn’t pull it taught but 
let it “fall” into the padded area.
This creates the extra needed 
seam allowance and “give”
to later stuff with a new insert.
I sewed a normal 5/8″ seam allowance
around the dog bed cover, then snipped every 
1/2″ or so around the curves to make the piece 
lay flat once turned and ironed.
Tools of the trade: embroidery scissors for snipping threads, quilter’s pins {I like these ever so much better than those short pins we all grew up with for sewing!}, various scissors {I can’t locate my good Ginghers… 🙁 }, and a small box I like to keep my seam rippers and sewing machine dusting brush in.  I think there’s a small Exacto knife in there, too. 🙂

Day Two {rather Evening 2}

I debated about how to close this cover
and decided to use buttons
as I’d like to be able to whip this doggy bed cover off
to the laundry whenever it is in need 
of a washing.
😉

So, I added an extra piece of fabric to the bottom piece’s 

seam allowance, right sides together. Then, after sewing up the side 
edges equal with the opening’s size, I reversed the “pocket” 
now~created then folding under its remaining raw edge over the 
original seam which was then stitched closed.  This will
become the part where I will sew the buttons.  
This whole piece will be unseen once flipped 
inside.   The top piece will get button holes once I know
what size buttons I am using.  For now, Yoda get a 
free~flapping bed cover!

Trés Magnifique! 
And there you have it…
A not too difficult dog bed cover 
that is contemporary
and classic…
and so much more 
suits my 
Shabby French Style!

Have a great Monday,
and let me know what fall projects
you are working on!

Blessings to you,
Barb 🙂



Sharing with ~
Create Link Inspire ~ The Crafty Blog Stalker
WOW Us Wednesdays ~ Savvy Southern Style
Feathered Nest Friday ~ French Country Cottage



Uncategorized

Sweet Sundays… My Little Craftroom

Stress relief is always good and for me it comes in the form of sewing!



I finally finished putting on the pleated edging around the second settee and in this photograph you can see the pleating as I was working on it.


On the left side of the room, there is a big closet
with many shelves storing little plastic boxes with
broken china, paper ephemera for projects,
bins full of past-used patterns and
bits of broken china for future projects.

Upper shelving bins hold faux flowers,
measuring tools
(I have several dressmaker tools such as a French-curve),
empty frames, fabrics for sewing,
and bits and bobs.
😉


This room is kinda small at just 9′ x 10′ but it is
plenty big on cuteness!
Open shelving stores floral boxes with memorabilia and photographs from many years of family life.
The window and back walls are where I work and play.



The right wall stores large photos from our kids’ sports years,
large photos from various family camps with our church,
and scouting goodies.



It is a room full of wonderful memories!




Happy Sunday blessings
to you!
I hope you have a wonderful
place to go and create, too.  🙂

Uncategorized

Making a Sofa Slipcover, Part 5 ~ Settee Cover Reveal

The Settee cover’s debutante party!
I love how it turned out!!!


After a couple of weeks noodling how I was going to 
stretch 202″ of fabric leftover for skirting
to fit around a sofa that needed 
200″
which didn’t include inseams…


I finally came up with the solution:
Gusset inserts of 11″ widths x 9″ tall of beautiful
Battenburg lace.


I wanted to use the lace but wasn’t sure where to cut the drop cloth
to get it all to work.

That’s what has been holding this post up. 
😉

I pulled out the side gusset so you could really see the fabric,
but normally it will be tucked under a bit.





There was a lot of pinning and re-pinning. Also had to remove pins from under the skirt as I went (that were holding on part of the welting, not already sewn down)
I felt like a very couture seamstress!!!


Another view of pinning around the skirt

Really loving this new slipcover! 
At month’s end, on payday, a trip to Lowe’s will be in-order…
to pick up another drop cloth for
Settee #2…
(you can see it peeking out over to the left there!)


Pretty nice and oh so ready for fall’s
afternoon cups of tea
and some 
fun reading.

***Thank you for “Liking,” “Sharing,” and “Following” my posts! Feel free to invite your friends and please leave a comment for me. Let me know what you’d like to see in a How-to post.  Enjoy!!!

To see the whole of Making a Settee Cover
Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4 ~ Ruching!

Blessings and Happy Sewing,
Uncategorized

Making a Settee Cover, Part 4 ~ Ruching!

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OM Goodness!
Browsing through an old favorite decorating book
a couple of days ago ~
Victoria Magazine’s
Intimate Home ~ Creating a Private World

I found this settee with the front-sections 
RUCHED! 


It was definitely a God-thing.
(He does that sometimes.)
I was in heaven!
You know that feeling you get when you gasp,
your mouth drops open
and your eyes
open wide?


Yep,
it was one of those ahah moments
when I knew
this was exactly how I wanted to
finish my settee cover.

So… I was wrong…
There will probably be five posts on
Making a Settee Cover.
Oh, well!  It’s a woman’s prerogative, is it not, to
change her mind?
😉 



*Updated 2018*
Making a Settee Cover, Part 1
Post 2
Post 3
Post 5 ~ Drop Cloth Settee Cover Reveal

So, I got busy making a paper pattern of my “arm-front.”
I traced the sofa’s arm edge
on both the front-side and the back-side of the paper.
When you trace on the back side, just lay
your pencil along the sofa’s side and press forward while pressing
the paper inward.  This will give a nice line that will be
the same width as your sofa’s arms, perfect so your cover fits nicely in the front!

I retraced from the front, also, checking once in a while
to see if what I was drawing was pretty close to what I had
drawn on the back.
 It was.
🙂


I marked-in the sofa’s wooden piece and extended the drawing
down to the “seat-deck’s” seam line.
really liked how the settee 
in the photograph
had a lot of ruching!




I knew that without much texture to the painter’s drop cloth 
that this cover was going to need something.
The ruching is it! 


Make the paper pattern by pinning it to the couch while tracing.
Couch’s 1980’s/1990’s wood ornamentation
Re-adding this photograph. 🙂



Update 2018 ~ I had photos for you sharing more on ruching
but I guess when I transferred the post from Weebly
they didn’t come over.

How to make ruching

Measure the length of the line going around
the outside edge of the couch arm and double it.

Cut your fabric width leaving 1/2″ extra for the side
and inner seams to the inset piece.

Cut your inset fabric piece by creating a separate pattern
piece and laying on your fabric to your desired placement.
Here I wanted certain Battenburg lace parts showing.

Cut the insert with 1/2″ seam allowances.

Gather the ruching pin to the inset piece and the sofa arm
while pinned on the settee ~ this requires you to have most
of the rest of the sofa pieces already sewn together.
*Plus having the welting already sewn in place along
the settee’s arm edging if using.

*Adjust your gathers as you go.  Seems to me I pinned to the
sofa first then to the inset piece so I wouldn’t have to
keep readjusting the gathers…



On a final note about welting
here are a few more photos 
as I am placing the welting into the “back seam.”
🙂

p.s I would love it if you’d “Share me!” Thank-you!


Sharing with
Beautifully Made #7

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Happy Sewing!  🙂
Uncategorized

Making a Settee Cover, Part 3

At the end of Part 2, the “back piece” was realigned with the “front piece” at the upper back of the settee, centers of both pieces together.  The pins were in-place along the lower back of the settee marking the height of the “seat-deck” around the sofa.  These will be used to transfer to the lower part of the “back piece” later on. 

  • Pin the “back piece” across the top of the sofa’s back, attaching it to the “front piece” all the way across out to the arms and to the back edges of the sofa.  Match up the seam lines, if you have drawn those on your pieces.  Draw your cutting line in and readjust your lines as necessary as you pin this piece to the sides of the sofa.  
  • Tip:  I like to pin my pieces directly to the whatever piece of furniture I am working on! It makes it easier to align the pieces. Make sure there is enough fabric beyond the sides of the sofa which will be sewn to the sofa’s “side pieces.” Check the “floor-to-pins”-measurement against the bottom of the “back piece” and mark these on the back piece. (We will recheck and make final marks once the cover is all sewn together, just before attaching the skirt.)
  • Look at the remaining yardage checking where the weft (the sideways “give” ) is again.  Measure the “side part” of your sofa/settee.  Mine was 8-1/2″ by 30-1/2″ so I cut my pieces out 1″ larger for the seam allowance. (displayed in this photo) 
Here is my sketch showing the “side part’s” measurements.

  • Now drape the remaining yardage over one of the sofa’s arms (Drape and cut out one sofa arm at a time.), keeping the weft going across the arm.  Think of the unstretchable part, the warp, as the part going from the front of your sofa to towards its back along the sofa’s arm.  The stretch will go from inside the sofa’s arm towards the outside and over the arm ending at the “under-arm seam.” (see photo above)
  • Tuck in your yardage but pull it taught along the sofa’s arm-top.  There will be some folds created that will be gathered into the seam as it is sewn later-on.  Draw in your seam-line.  I did this by pulling-up the part that was tucked-in and creating a curved line along the inside area of the fabric perpendicular to the “seat deck.”  Leave several inches of fabric extra in the lower third to half of this “arm-piece” to tuck-in later into that inside seam.  This extra fabric will be the looseness needed to pull the completed settee cover over your piece of furniture without making it too tight.  I like my furniture covers pretty tight, but you may want yours to have a looser fit. 🙂

  

  • Pin together the “arm-piece” to the “front-piece” creating tucks to take up the extra fabric. Drape, mark and cut-out the other “arm-piece,” drawing lines and creating tucks as needed. Put the tucks in roughly the same place as on the opposite arm.
  • Pin together the “arm-pieces” to the “seat-deck” beginning from the back of the seat coming forward.  This will ensure that there is enough fabric where it needs to be tucked later.  Clip the seam allowance as needed to get the pieces to marry-up.  Cut a 1/2″ or 5/8″ seam allowance away from your drawn line.  In this next photograph, you can see how I left extra fabric for that inside “arm-piece” and that I drew in all of my lines.    Draw-in and cut-out the part along the back of the sofa where the “back-piece” will join to this “arm-piece.”  


Now, take off what you have pinned together and sew these seams.  I plan on sewing my arm and seat seams first then I’ll re-fit those pieces to the sofa and then pin the “back-piece” and the “side-pieces” on, sewing them next.   🙂 If you plan on using welting on any of these seams, now is the time to make it before you sew your seams.  I plan on putting welting along the “upper back seam”, but not on the “inner seam” here.  Also, I will be put welting around the “skirt,” along the “side-seam” and around the “front-arm pieces,” which have not been made yet.




Time to make Welting! 🙂 

Okay, “welting” is made by cutting out fabric on the bias, or across the diagonal.  What you will do is put your “cording” in-between lengths of your remaining fabric.  Figure out how much fabric you will need to make your welting. My cording is 1/4″ wide, so I will cut mine at 2-1/2″ wide which will leave enough fabric, once folded and sewn, to have for a seam allowance.  Cut out lengths of this over and over, then stitch these lengths all-together.  You’ll need enough welting to stitch into every seam in which you plan on having welting, so add up all of your seams’ measurements to get a rough estimate.  More can be created later-on if you start running out. 😉  

Sew the cording inside the fabric right next to the cording.  Use your zipper foot.  FYI:  Welting is cut on the bias so that it can stretch in two directions making it conform to whatever shape needed. Sew the cording into each seam in-between the pieces of fabric remembering to face the welting towards the right side of your pieces.  You can always attach it to one piece, then sew the opposing piece on next instead of trying to sew all three together at once.    




Cut out the “front-arm pieces” and stitch on welting.  Sew these into the sofa cover.


Making the skirt — take your “floor-to-seat-deck” measurement for the height, and measure around the sofa’s total widths for your width/length.  

Decide if you want:
Lightly gathered skirt — multiply by 1-1/2 times the sofas ‘s widths
Fully-gathered skirt — multiply the width by 2 times
Pleats all around — take a lot of fabric, like a kilt. I don’t recommend them here, but they look really cute on chairs!
Pleats on just the sofa corners, and maybe the front and back centers — this is what I am using since my width of usable fabric is barely once around my sofa. I am using two of my remaining, original, pre-seamed pieces of the drop-cloth for the skirt (Less sewing!). I have another fabric that I am going to add-in at each spot, then pleat the drop-cloth fabric over the top of this insert. 


  Photos of the finished Settee Cover next time!

*Update 2018*
Making a Settee Cover ~ Part 1
Part 2
Ruching ~ Part 4
Making a Sofa Slipcover ~ The Reveal


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Happy Sewing!