Uncategorized

Crafts to Make ~ Fabric Rosette Tutorial

Happy Tuesday, Everybody!

Several people have asked how to make
a fabric rosette or rose and I had shared
Maria’s tutorial
where she made a super cute painted rosette
drop cloth pillow covered
in 75 rosettes,
mine turned out just
a bit differently…


So, here’s how to make mine:

Supplies you’ll need

fabric of your choice
glue gun and hot glue sticks
iron and ironing board
cup of water
{for when that glue gets on your fingers!}
😉
*Also a great time to use up a bunch of scraps
even if you have to sew them together in a line!

Basic instructions for 1 rosette

*Cut a 2″ wide strip of fabric about 36″ long.
Fold in half lengthwise and iron across.

Choose one:
*A. Open up the fold and fold both sides inward to the
ironed line and iron again, closing the original fold.
{so it looks like seam binding ~ this is exactly
how you make self-fabric seam binding, btw.}
*B.  Just fold in half lengthwise again
ironing along this second, thicker fold.
Two edges will be loose and stringy.
{This is how I made mine.}

*Begin with a half-inch fold on one end and keep
rolling the fabric around that half-inch.
Pinch in spots as you go creating a bump.

*Hot glue from the underside and in between
as you wind the fabric around.

*Now twist the fabric once, then a second time, 
creating a bump which in turn creates a “petal.”

Sorry this was a it blurry… You can see the 1/2″ original fold with some winding around next creating the inside of the rose.
These are the “pinches” here.  After a circle of these, I began the double twist to make “petals.” 

*Continue adding petals and twisting in and out
moving petals around creating a realistic looking rose.
Reverse the twist if you like, too!
One rose I made with reverses in it.

*Finish by hot gluing the end underneath.

*Add a fabric hanger or add a safety pin
if using as a pin or closure.

Here I sewed a fabric hanger strip that I hot glued both of its ends to the rosette’s underside
creating a loop to put the chair ties through. 


In case you missed it

These rosettes I shared last week as 
part of the
drop cloth-grain sack slipcover project
I worked on this past month.

If you have any other questions about 
making a fabric rosette or any of my other projects,
please feel free to leave a message here or 
drop me an email.
I’d love to hear from you!
🙂
Sharing with
Create Link Inspire ~ The Crafty Blog Stalker
Really Crafty Link Party ~ Keeping It Real
Totally Terrific Tuesday ~ The Savvy Apron
Talk of the Town ~ Sadie Seasongoods
Wow Us Wednesdays ~ Savvy Southern Style
Friday at the Firestation ~ A Fireman’s Wife
Feathered Nest Friday ~ French Country Cottage

Happy Crafting,

Uncategorized

Drop Cloth-Grain Sack Slipcover Reveal

I am happy to finally be able
to share these
drop cloth-grain sack chair slipcovers
with you all…
🙂




Not only did I buy a Cricut machine three weeks ago
{as hand-cutting stencils with carpal tunnel syndrome plus
having three bad neck disks… Not such a good idea.}
I was hesitant to learn its programming
for a full week
thinking I might take it back and buy
the brand new Cricut version
that is just out called:
The Maker.
But, I didn’t and saved money
with the Cricut Explore Air 2.

When I finally decided to unwrap the Explore
and began playing around with importing files
I found out you can’t just pull in any old picture ~
Cricut will only load certain “picture” saved versions,
not how Word saves…

How to Save a Word Document on a Mac to Use in Cricut

1. Save your photo or word(s) you want to print
like usual in Microsoft Word.

2. Go to “Finder” in your regular Chrome or Safari
{I use Chrome mostly}
and find “Export” under “File or Edit or View.”

3.  In “Export” there is a spot to “Save file as”
and this is where you change your file type to a
.png file.
Cricut uses picture files which includes:
.jpg, .gif, .png, .bmp, .svg, .dxf

4. Save this new copy and recheck your Finder
to make sure you now have a second copy with
the correct file name.
This is the time to rename the file if you create
multiple copies of the same thing like I did.

5. Go to Cricut and import your file to create.
😀

Hope that helps if you decide to
create some stencils!
It has literally taken me a week to remember
where to find the way to make .png files and
to then create seven stencils…


Perseverance

Okay, I have to share something…
I have never done anything the easy way
like using something
that is in an already downloadable-form-
already-made-kinda-way…


My first sewing project the summer,
after I took a beginner sewing class in high school
working with a sewing machine,
I made a sleeveless eyelet dress.
It had three skirt tiers and 1/2″ wide satin ribbon
which needed to be sewn along the
lower edge of each skirts layer.
What was I thinking?

I cried. A lot. I was 15 years old.
And it took a week with those tears every day
some frustration and a lot of learning
and the use of a seam ripper
{Oh! and adding a zipper}
but
I finished and wore that dress!

Such were some of the trials with making these
drop cloth-grain sack slipcovers.
🙂





Making Stencils

I looked all around for some wreaths I could download
for free but only came across ones available
for quite a sum from Shutterstock and
a company which creates stencils as their business.

Another site found while looking at all the
wreaths and sprays on Shutterstock
took me to Vectors.
Vectors had another free downloadable tutorial.
It’s good!
Later in the week I found a guy named
Billy Argel who makes German Style Fonts
and you can use them for free
for your own personal use.
IT’S JUST WHAT I’M LOOKING FOR
only…
If I could figure out how to open and use the font…
Seriously.
{are we sensing a pattern here? *Hubby helped this past weekend.}
😉

If you want to use his fonts for any business
purposes, then he has a way to do so and
of course there is a charge.
If I decide to do something more with stenciling
then of course I will be happy to pay him.


Downloading Fonts

Turns out it isn’t too hard ~ I just didn’t know
what file to open.
🙂

1. Hubby showed me that once you have your font
downloaded, they should have been saved to a folder.

2. Find the folder and font, then double click on the “.tnt” file.
This is the file which will bring up the actual font type.

3. From this, you’ll see the “Save font” button
and it should automatically save into your
Word or word processing application.

4. Go into Word and under “Font” you’ll see
“Font Collections” at the very top.
You may have to name a folder but your new font(s)
should be stored there in Font Collections.
It was that easy.  Yeah!

Then I came across Haley’s blog called
The Mountain View Cottage
and she had a few free printables
which she has created to make her own artwork.
So… this is where I downloaded a spray of wheat!

I ended up not using her spray of wheat. 
Perhaps in another project.
She just asks that whomever downloads
her printables to please publicize
her pin, and here it is!




I finally found some great German fonts and Cricut had a leaf vector spray that I was able to use.





The Reveal
So all that leads us to sharing the Big Reveal
of our dining room chairs’ slipcovers!
I created a different kind of back ~ 
more like a little summer sundress…
with a flirty bare midriff…

ooh la la!!!

These were finished up with sweet sundress ties
and a rosette holding the ties closed
made from leftover dropcloth.


I got this idea for this rosette from
Marie at The Interior Frugalista
when
Debra over at Shoppe No. 5 {Day 1}
posted a two-day drop cloth event earlier this summer
of which the
settee covers tutorial
I made a few years ago were included on Day 2.



The seat covers now have their little skirt bottoms covered
with the fourth skirting piece plus a tie closure
with sweet pearly buttons
that mimick the
bigger sundress tie closures
on the chair backs.



My signature style ~ buttons

On our dining room chair cushions that I made
about five years ago
I used button closures, too.
I ran with the idea because a few years earlier
I had recovered a barrel chair with
renaissance style buttons
I had saved since I was a teen and
I used them to tuft the chair back.

The button closures can just be seen on the dining room chairs which, coincidentally, are reversible.  I used an two old
Martha Stewart curtains found at K-Mart years ago to make the tops, and a red floral paisley to make the bottoms.

I do like buttons! and have collected them
since I was taking them out of my
mom’s sewing box when I was around
7 years of age.
😉

The 1970’s barrel chair  {by the Christmas tree, right} I found at a thriftstore and repainted white using all kinds of old
shank buttons for tufting the back of the chair.  Sorry, not visible here as it’s hidden by the Christmas pillow.
Bauernladen-Klein is an actual cattle and pig farm with a butcher store on site over in Leverkusen, Germany.  I was an
exchange student to Leverkusen when I was 19, so it seemed like a fun idea to pick a farm name from there!


Business in the front ~ Party in the back!

So there we are… This project has had its challenges
for sure but I really like the results!
I changed the back to be less like a tank top and
{my original design}
to a more traditional style as I realized the grain sack idea
wasn’t going to work with the tank top design.


(Might just have to make the cute tanktop
idea with a fun print later on!)


Here is the beginning of this slipcover project
if you’d like to read or learn more:
Just click on these links to see
Part 1 and Part 2.


If you like these posts, please consider signing up in the sidebar to receive updates as new posts come out.
Thank-you!


Sharing with
Dishing It Digging It ~ Rustic and Refined
Inspire Me Monday ~ Create with Joy
Really Crafty Link Party ~ Keeping It Real
Totally Terrific Tuesday ~ The Savvy Apron
Wow Us Wednesday ~ Savvy Southern Style
Wonderful Wednesday ~ Oh, My Heartsie Girl!
Welcome Home Wednesday ~ Five Kids a Dog and a Blog
Feathered Nest Friday ~ French Country Cottage
Talk of the Town ~ Interior Frugalista
Farmhouse Friday ~ The Painted Hinge


*P.S. ~ This post was Featured at: 
Wow Us Wednesday
Savvy Southern Style
on
Wednesday, September 20, 2017
Woot Woot!
😀

“For no word from God will ever fail.” 

Luke 1:37 NIV

“Therefore, since we have so great a cloud of witnesses surrounding us, let us also lay aside every encumbrance and the sin which so easily entangles us, and let us run with endurance the race that is set before us,”

Hebrews 12:1 NASB

Blessings to you,



Uncategorized

How to Make a Chair Slipcover ~ Part 2 and an Update…

Okay, so what looks so easy to do ~
all those lovely dropcloth chairs you see
on Pinterest all lovely and stenciled
and looking like original
grain sacks…


After printing the wording in Microsoft Word, then the fun with cutting the stencil began.

There is a huge reason WHY you pay
a small fortune for those stencils
and for chair slipcovers with stencils
already on them.
They are really hard to hand cut!

But I’m getting ahead of myself.
😉

I love the dropcloth slipcovers I have seen
with stencils you can buy premade from
Maison de Stencils
but I was thinking to myself
that I want something original…
Blithely I thought, “I can make my own.”
I’m a DIYer and designer so…
why not??

Part 2 ~ Chair Slipcovers’ Stenciling

Gather all your supplies:
stencil pouncing brush
painter’s tape
paint that will work on pre-washed
and dried fabric
precut stencils with words,
numbers, and pictures.
{unless you’re crazy like me to make your own!}

Begin by figuring out how large your piece of fabric
needs to be for each chair back, and it’s layout
with words and other stencils on your fabric.

Find the vertical centers of the top and bottom
of your fabric and dry iron a light guideline into it.

Tape off lines to paint with painter’s tape then with
your stencil brush pounce paint down the open lines.  
Be careful with the paint as it’s easy to accidentally
get paint on the fabric where you don’t want it.
{ask me HOW I know this…}

I decided on an Anita’s Deep Denim blue (308066)
and Black (11002) and used a little of the black
mixed into the blue to get an even deeper blue.





Traditional grain sacks had blue, black, 
red, green or brown writing on them.  
Choose whichever colors you like 
for your project.
Pink for a young girl’s birthday party
would be awfully fun!!!
🙂

Let dry overnight per some sites I read, 
or until dry to the touch.
I was able to sew my fabric late in the day
after about six hours after the lines were
pounced with paint.
I really used a light amount of paint with each
application, but I went over each section
a few times to deepen the color with paint.


Here you can see I was still deciding whether I wanted the year in the middle or underneath.

Adding the Stencils and Transfers

Mostly why I didn’t get these slips done earlier
in the week was because I was creating the wording
in Microsoft Word
{these are 120 point German font}
and then I found a bee and wreath I liked
on the internet and copied it to my computer.

Hubby helped me move the picture into
Photoshop where I was able to add the 2014
***which MUST BE MIRROR IMAGED to print correctly
when ironed on fabric.***
into the space just inside the mouth
of the wreath.
This was printed onto transfer paper.

Iron on any fabric transfers using a dry iron
{remove all water from the iron first by dumping out.}
according to manufacturer’s instructions.

That’s it for today because I’m still deciding on
how I want the chair backs to look on their backs.
This is my original design but I’m not sure
if it will work with these chairs as
they have oval insets…

To see more, check out Part 1.

So… I’ll noodle this and play around with
chair tops a little more.
🙂

To see more dropcloth ideas, please 
check out my friend
Debra Pashowsky’s blog ~ Shoppe No. 5
of which an older post of mine
Sofa Slipcovers
was graciously included!


Next time I should have the reveal and
I’ll tell you what is written on each chair’s front.

Sharing with
Wow Us Wednesday ~ Savvy Southern Style
Share Your Style ~ The Red Painted Cottage
Friday at the Fire Station ~ A Fireman’s Wife
Blogger’s Pitstop ~ This Autoimmune Life
Home Matters ~ Life With Lorelai
Create Bake Grow Gather ~ Shabby Art Boutique
Blogging Fifty
Inspire Me Monday ~ Create with Joy
Feathered Nest Friday ~ French Country Cottage
The Really Crafty Link Party ~ Keeping It Real

Happy Sewing,
Uncategorized

Just a Quick Post…

Just a quick post…
Was really under the weather yesterday so I
got NOTHING done so doing double time
today!  🙂  

I’ve been wanting to make some pretty
drop cloth slipcovers for these two
chairs here in our Prairie Home
for a little while now.
I saw a cute idea over at a favorite store
{I’ll share that place when I post the final post tomorrow or Friday}
 and that gave me an idea!
Skirted dining room chair cover with tiebacks and rosette ~ front to be a little tank top!
So here’s the beginnings of a 
flirty little dining room chair cover
I just designed…
Sharing with:
Tuesdays with a Twist ~ Stone Cottage Adventures
Feathered Nest Friday ~ French Country Cottage
Friday Features ~ Oh, My Heartsie Girl!

That’s all for now, folks!
😉
Uncategorized

Making a Sofa Slipcover, Part 5 ~ Settee Cover Reveal

The Settee cover’s debutante party!
I love how it turned out!!!


After a couple of weeks noodling how I was going to 
stretch 202″ of fabric leftover for skirting
to fit around a sofa that needed 
200″
which didn’t include inseams…


I finally came up with the solution:
Gusset inserts of 11″ widths x 9″ tall of beautiful
Battenburg lace.


I wanted to use the lace but wasn’t sure where to cut the drop cloth
to get it all to work.

That’s what has been holding this post up. 
😉

I pulled out the side gusset so you could really see the fabric,
but normally it will be tucked under a bit.





There was a lot of pinning and re-pinning. Also had to remove pins from under the skirt as I went (that were holding on part of the welting, not already sewn down)
I felt like a very couture seamstress!!!


Another view of pinning around the skirt

Really loving this new slipcover! 
At month’s end, on payday, a trip to Lowe’s will be in-order…
to pick up another drop cloth for
Settee #2…
(you can see it peeking out over to the left there!)


Pretty nice and oh so ready for fall’s
afternoon cups of tea
and some 
fun reading.

***Thank you for “Liking,” “Sharing,” and “Following” my posts! Feel free to invite your friends and please leave a comment for me. Let me know what you’d like to see in a How-to post.  Enjoy!!!

To see the whole of Making a Settee Cover
Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4 ~ Ruching!

Blessings and Happy Sewing,
Uncategorized

Making a Settee Cover, Part 4 ~ Ruching!

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OM Goodness!
Browsing through an old favorite decorating book
a couple of days ago ~
Victoria Magazine’s
Intimate Home ~ Creating a Private World

I found this settee with the front-sections 
RUCHED! 


It was definitely a God-thing.
(He does that sometimes.)
I was in heaven!
You know that feeling you get when you gasp,
your mouth drops open
and your eyes
open wide?


Yep,
it was one of those ahah moments
when I knew
this was exactly how I wanted to
finish my settee cover.

So… I was wrong…
There will probably be five posts on
Making a Settee Cover.
Oh, well!  It’s a woman’s prerogative, is it not, to
change her mind?
😉 



*Updated 2018*
Making a Settee Cover, Part 1
Post 2
Post 3
Post 5 ~ Drop Cloth Settee Cover Reveal

So, I got busy making a paper pattern of my “arm-front.”
I traced the sofa’s arm edge
on both the front-side and the back-side of the paper.
When you trace on the back side, just lay
your pencil along the sofa’s side and press forward while pressing
the paper inward.  This will give a nice line that will be
the same width as your sofa’s arms, perfect so your cover fits nicely in the front!

I retraced from the front, also, checking once in a while
to see if what I was drawing was pretty close to what I had
drawn on the back.
 It was.
🙂


I marked-in the sofa’s wooden piece and extended the drawing
down to the “seat-deck’s” seam line.
really liked how the settee 
in the photograph
had a lot of ruching!




I knew that without much texture to the painter’s drop cloth 
that this cover was going to need something.
The ruching is it! 


Make the paper pattern by pinning it to the couch while tracing.
Couch’s 1980’s/1990’s wood ornamentation
Re-adding this photograph. 🙂



Update 2018 ~ I had photos for you sharing more on ruching
but I guess when I transferred the post from Weebly
they didn’t come over.

How to make ruching

Measure the length of the line going around
the outside edge of the couch arm and double it.

Cut your fabric width leaving 1/2″ extra for the side
and inner seams to the inset piece.

Cut your inset fabric piece by creating a separate pattern
piece and laying on your fabric to your desired placement.
Here I wanted certain Battenburg lace parts showing.

Cut the insert with 1/2″ seam allowances.

Gather the ruching pin to the inset piece and the sofa arm
while pinned on the settee ~ this requires you to have most
of the rest of the sofa pieces already sewn together.
*Plus having the welting already sewn in place along
the settee’s arm edging if using.

*Adjust your gathers as you go.  Seems to me I pinned to the
sofa first then to the inset piece so I wouldn’t have to
keep readjusting the gathers…



On a final note about welting
here are a few more photos 
as I am placing the welting into the “back seam.”
🙂

p.s I would love it if you’d “Share me!” Thank-you!


Sharing with
Beautifully Made #7

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Happy Sewing!  🙂
Uncategorized

Making a Settee Cover, Part 3

At the end of Part 2, the “back piece” was realigned with the “front piece” at the upper back of the settee, centers of both pieces together.  The pins were in-place along the lower back of the settee marking the height of the “seat-deck” around the sofa.  These will be used to transfer to the lower part of the “back piece” later on. 

  • Pin the “back piece” across the top of the sofa’s back, attaching it to the “front piece” all the way across out to the arms and to the back edges of the sofa.  Match up the seam lines, if you have drawn those on your pieces.  Draw your cutting line in and readjust your lines as necessary as you pin this piece to the sides of the sofa.  
  • Tip:  I like to pin my pieces directly to the whatever piece of furniture I am working on! It makes it easier to align the pieces. Make sure there is enough fabric beyond the sides of the sofa which will be sewn to the sofa’s “side pieces.” Check the “floor-to-pins”-measurement against the bottom of the “back piece” and mark these on the back piece. (We will recheck and make final marks once the cover is all sewn together, just before attaching the skirt.)
  • Look at the remaining yardage checking where the weft (the sideways “give” ) is again.  Measure the “side part” of your sofa/settee.  Mine was 8-1/2″ by 30-1/2″ so I cut my pieces out 1″ larger for the seam allowance. (displayed in this photo) 
Here is my sketch showing the “side part’s” measurements.

  • Now drape the remaining yardage over one of the sofa’s arms (Drape and cut out one sofa arm at a time.), keeping the weft going across the arm.  Think of the unstretchable part, the warp, as the part going from the front of your sofa to towards its back along the sofa’s arm.  The stretch will go from inside the sofa’s arm towards the outside and over the arm ending at the “under-arm seam.” (see photo above)
  • Tuck in your yardage but pull it taught along the sofa’s arm-top.  There will be some folds created that will be gathered into the seam as it is sewn later-on.  Draw in your seam-line.  I did this by pulling-up the part that was tucked-in and creating a curved line along the inside area of the fabric perpendicular to the “seat deck.”  Leave several inches of fabric extra in the lower third to half of this “arm-piece” to tuck-in later into that inside seam.  This extra fabric will be the looseness needed to pull the completed settee cover over your piece of furniture without making it too tight.  I like my furniture covers pretty tight, but you may want yours to have a looser fit. 🙂

  

  • Pin together the “arm-piece” to the “front-piece” creating tucks to take up the extra fabric. Drape, mark and cut-out the other “arm-piece,” drawing lines and creating tucks as needed. Put the tucks in roughly the same place as on the opposite arm.
  • Pin together the “arm-pieces” to the “seat-deck” beginning from the back of the seat coming forward.  This will ensure that there is enough fabric where it needs to be tucked later.  Clip the seam allowance as needed to get the pieces to marry-up.  Cut a 1/2″ or 5/8″ seam allowance away from your drawn line.  In this next photograph, you can see how I left extra fabric for that inside “arm-piece” and that I drew in all of my lines.    Draw-in and cut-out the part along the back of the sofa where the “back-piece” will join to this “arm-piece.”  


Now, take off what you have pinned together and sew these seams.  I plan on sewing my arm and seat seams first then I’ll re-fit those pieces to the sofa and then pin the “back-piece” and the “side-pieces” on, sewing them next.   🙂 If you plan on using welting on any of these seams, now is the time to make it before you sew your seams.  I plan on putting welting along the “upper back seam”, but not on the “inner seam” here.  Also, I will be put welting around the “skirt,” along the “side-seam” and around the “front-arm pieces,” which have not been made yet.




Time to make Welting! 🙂 

Okay, “welting” is made by cutting out fabric on the bias, or across the diagonal.  What you will do is put your “cording” in-between lengths of your remaining fabric.  Figure out how much fabric you will need to make your welting. My cording is 1/4″ wide, so I will cut mine at 2-1/2″ wide which will leave enough fabric, once folded and sewn, to have for a seam allowance.  Cut out lengths of this over and over, then stitch these lengths all-together.  You’ll need enough welting to stitch into every seam in which you plan on having welting, so add up all of your seams’ measurements to get a rough estimate.  More can be created later-on if you start running out. 😉  

Sew the cording inside the fabric right next to the cording.  Use your zipper foot.  FYI:  Welting is cut on the bias so that it can stretch in two directions making it conform to whatever shape needed. Sew the cording into each seam in-between the pieces of fabric remembering to face the welting towards the right side of your pieces.  You can always attach it to one piece, then sew the opposing piece on next instead of trying to sew all three together at once.    




Cut out the “front-arm pieces” and stitch on welting.  Sew these into the sofa cover.


Making the skirt — take your “floor-to-seat-deck” measurement for the height, and measure around the sofa’s total widths for your width/length.  

Decide if you want:
Lightly gathered skirt — multiply by 1-1/2 times the sofas ‘s widths
Fully-gathered skirt — multiply the width by 2 times
Pleats all around — take a lot of fabric, like a kilt. I don’t recommend them here, but they look really cute on chairs!
Pleats on just the sofa corners, and maybe the front and back centers — this is what I am using since my width of usable fabric is barely once around my sofa. I am using two of my remaining, original, pre-seamed pieces of the drop-cloth for the skirt (Less sewing!). I have another fabric that I am going to add-in at each spot, then pleat the drop-cloth fabric over the top of this insert. 


  Photos of the finished Settee Cover next time!

*Update 2018*
Making a Settee Cover ~ Part 1
Part 2
Ruching ~ Part 4
Making a Sofa Slipcover ~ The Reveal


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Happy Sewing!


Uncategorized

Making a Settee Cover, Part 2

Last time  we left off I was getting ready to show you how to measure for the back-piece of the sofa.  My original measurements showed this sofa as 33″ from the floor to where the center of the wood curve is at the “upper back.”  This settee used to have a decorative oak arch along the top, but I grew tired of it and it made the sofa look really 90’s, so I took it off, padded the space, and stapled and pulled the upper back fabrics together.  This has created a new “arch” that looks great, but is a bit unsightly the way I finished it, especially since I move the sofas around a lot and like them away from the walls. 🙂  In addition, now without that oak piece, the added benefit is the two settees look more like a pair. 🙂  Anyway, this is one of the reasons I wanted to make a slipcover for this and the other settee. 😉


Here I have left the original 12′ of canvas drop-cloth fabric just hanging over the back of the sofa. The seat-deck is tucked-in with it’s seam in place. I have drawn a line where I want my back-piece seam to be. I cut 5/8″ BELOW this back-line to create the seam-allowance. This is where I will add-in welting. The side-seam and its seam-allowance are ready to go!

How to Make a Settee Cover (cont.)

  1. Step 6, really — For the “back-piece” of the sofa cover, cut BELOW your drawn line either 1/2″ or 5/8″ for your seam allowance. Also, if you have put that “drop cloth seam” over at your sofa’s edge like I did, above, cut that off, too.  Cut it off just PAST the seam (in my case, just to the left of the seam).  This will create a seam-allowance for joining your “arm-piece” to the “front” and “back” pieces.  The right side was already up-to-and-slightly-overlapping the right edge, so no need to cut anything over there except where the fabric needs to be cut off for the arm.  The rest of the length of yardage, put aside for just a second.  
  2. Find the center of the curved-over “front piece.”  Place a glass-head pin there. This can be easily done by pulling the piece up, folding the piece itself in half and marking the middle with your pin and/or marking with a pencil, or by doing the following.  Tip:  This is how you can also mark-off “store-bought pattern pieces” without having to cut out those little triangles or squares where you will match-up pattern pieces — just put a 1/4″ slit perpendicular into the fabric, like you would do when “grading a curve.” This eliminates the need to cut-out those “tabs.” Makes getting to your sewing faster!!! 
  3. Now, re-tuck and lay the “front piece” back down along the sofa’s upper back-edge.  Carefully, realign the drawn edge back along the wood edge.  Realign the side edges, which you should have drawn-in before so you can see where to stitch after everything comes off. 🙂 If you haven’t already done this, do so now. 🙂 *** Sorry if I didn’t make this very clear in the last post!  Trying to think of it all. 🙂 — (top photo)
  4. Rehang the back-piece — Take the remaining length of fabric and pin it back to the “front piece.” I did this with overlapping my 5/8″ seam in the middle (fold this fabric in half along the cut-off edge, pin as for the “front-piece”, above, finding the center point in this next piece, the new “back piece,” going ABOVE the curved line of the settee’s back. It will look like a big box at first. 

  1. Redraw the wooden piece’s curve onto this new “back-piece.”  I like that you can feel the wood piece below and can use it as a guide.  Your sofa may not have one, so make an arc as best as you can.  Cut your “seam-allowance” ABOVE this newly-drawn curve.  Now you have the upper curve of the “back-piece!”  After I drew the curve, I unpinned and took the whole canvas off moving over to my table to cut the curve over there.  I wanted to make sure my “seam-allowance” for this piece was going to be correct.  I folded my fabric over, rechecking my center point.  This also gives you the point to match-up with the “front piece.” Make sure you have enough fabric to get to your sofa’s side edges.  If not, add in fabric with extra seams to the “back piece” on both sides to make your piece work for you. 
  2. Measure the heights from the five pins along the back’s lower seam will be. These should all be the same height as your “deck-height” from the “front seat-deck piece.”  Adjust as necessary. Our floor is slightly irregular as we laid it ourselves.  My measurement is 12-3/4″, so now measure from each pin vertically up to where a vertical line would hit along your sofa-back’s curve.  Write those measurements onto your drawn diagram of your Back View.  Transfer all those lengths to your “back piece,” then cut off the remaining fabric length.  This is what I have already done in this photograph. 


    1. Here I have shown several things at once: * Measuring up from the floor, you can see where the pins have been placed along the back (above the blue painter’s tape, at 12-3/4″/12.75″ off of the floor) where the sofa skirt will attach. * The yard stick is there as a guide to show various lengths — the height of the pin at that point, about 33″ off the floor. * The painter’s tape at the upper center along the curve shows the upper-middle of the sofa where both pieces are pinned together.



    2. My original post didn’t include this next photograph, so I hope this helps!
      ***
      I hope you are enjoying this little series on how to make a slipcover for your sofa!
      🙂

      I have tried to make this simple enough for anyone to sew.


      I may not have enough photographs for those of you who are beginners but I’ve tried to be thorough in the written details.
      Write me and I will be happy to help!



    *Update 2018*
    Find the other links here
    Making a Settee Cover ~ Part 1
    Part 3
    Ruching ~ Part 4
    Making a Sofa/Settee Cover ~ The Reveal



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    Happy Sewing!
    Uncategorized

    Making a Settee Cover, Part 1




    Today I thought I’d share the sofa cover I am starting for one of our living room’s settees.  Perhaps you have thought about doing the same with your favorite, comfortable but worn sofa!  Well, they aren’t that difficult to do.  🙂

    Start by taking your sofa’s measurements.  Draw pictures on paper of your sofa and put all of the sofa’s measurements. These details may seem very simplistic, but I find that many things my daughter and I try to create from the internet aren’t detailed enough.       (upper photo)

    Sofa’s main measurements I was looking specifically at the “from-the-floor” to the “seat-deck” height. This sofa’s height is 12-3/4″. I used this height to place quilter’s pins all the way around the sofa at that height. This will be my height where the sofa’ skirt and welting will be sewn in later-on. 

    Measure twice — As the old saying goes before you decide to start cutting.  I bleached a super large painter’s drop cloth from a big box building supply store, the 9′ x 12′ one, specifically for this project.  This took about two days to get it to bleach out enough.  After I get it all sewed together, I may bleach it again.  



    I am trying for a Shabby Chic white-look.  These canvas cloths are tough, a whole lot of fabric and the cost is Perfect!  Just over $20.

    1. Look at your cloth and drape over your sofa.  Check the cloth’s parts for where the stretch is in each section. If the cloth has odd pieces sewn-in to “fill in” to make the drop cloth the right size, check all of the pieces.  
    2. My cloth’s “extra piece” was rail-roaded, which means it was turned sideways and sewn in.  Cloth has vertical, non-stretch warp and that’s the part you want going “up” on most of the parts of your sofa, if that makes sense. Warp helps the fabric keep its shape. The stretchy, sideways weft is what you want going “around” the sofa, and over the curving arm-parts. The weft is what will “give” so that it can cover the sofa appropriately when put on. 



    1. Creating the pattern — So, as you go to cut your pieces out, you are creating the pattern right on the sofa.  I like to begin with the seat deck (take off the pillows and cushion, obviously).  My fabric had a seam running through the length of it horizontally.  This was perfect for the stretch to run sideways,  so I used that seam to “tuck in” at the back where the seat deck meets the front sofa-back.  This saved on sewing as the seam was already done!  (see 2nd and 4th photos above)
    2. Cut out around the sofa’s arms on this first cut piece. Leave a seam allowance of the standard 5/8″, or as I learned from my tailoring instructor in college, you can just take a 1/2″ allowance on all of your pieces.  Up to you what you prefer. (see Sofa-Deck, front photo — the second photo down)

      

    Welting can be seen here in this photo, above, on a chair cover I made a few years ago.  Welting is the self-covered cording used to stabilize and add decoration to chair cushions and covers. In another post I will discuss how to create welting.

    Well, this is where we will stop for today.  Have a super weekend!
    ***To be continued***

    *Update 2018*

    Here are the links to the following four posts.
    A long series but I was really thorough when I wrote
    this as I thought I might create a lot of sewing and
    craft posts ~ and I do.
    🙂
    Making a Settee Cover ~ Part 2
    Part 3
    Ruching ~ Part 4
    Making a Sofa/Settee Cover ~ The Reveal

    Sharing with
    Happiness is Homemade ~ The Painted Hinge
    Wow ~ Savvy Southern Style



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    Happy Sewing!