Uncategorized

Beautiful Embroidered Lace ~ Appenzell WeiBstickerei

Last fall  I found the prettiest lace handkerchief with the tiniest little stitches and pretty flowers woven into it on a fluke while driving around Dallas and just happened to be passing
by a thriftshop…


Recently  I used this pretty handkerchief as a napkin
in this pretty tablesetting but then I got to thinking
about it… and I wondered what kind of lace
was this?
Another of my newer thriftshop finds ~ this cotton hanky is delicately trimmed with
just the tiniest little flowers all the way around it’s four edges.


Both of these handkerchiefs above were found at thriftshops ~ 
the lower is a man’s handkerchief from the early 1900’s
is my guess.
The Appenzeller wedding handkerchief {top} showcases
a beautiful and probably handmade bobbin lace edging ~
3″ at its widest and 4 1/2″ long at the corners.
Amazingly beautiful with a small peony or waterlily in the Appenzell embroidery technique
set just inside one corner of the cotton batiste handkerchief ~ 
this was certainly handmade!

Would you believe I found this one inside a large
but not great picture frame for a mere $4.00?
True story!
🙂

So here’s a little history of this type of lace for you.



A bit of an oops photo!  I didn’t look at what direction I had the plate… Oh, well!  Really shows the beauty of this lace.  😉



History of Appenzeller Embroidery

Appenzeller weiBstickerei is the name in German and in English
{pronounced like “apple” and weiBstickerei has a “double S” written as a capital B}
it is called “the whitework of Appenzell {Switzerland}.”
According to Tourismus Appenzell this type of whitework
“evolved from three related craft industries: tapestry,
cotton spinnery and chain stitch embroidery.”

The peak period when this embroidery technique was hand-sewn was during the 1850’s.
Machine embroidery became available during the Industrial Revolution and basically wiped out all handmade lace industry
with its cheaper costs and mass production ~
quality was sacrificed.
In an excellent paper published by the author of Studio Stitch Art ~ 20th Century Lace: The Struggle Between Machine Lace and Hand Made Lace
the author discusses that combining usage of the jacquard loom carding techniques with the lace backing created by the
bobbin net machine, infinite possibilities in lace designs
were now at the designers’ fingertips.

Skilled lacemakers were stunned at the better quality of
this new machinery but purists {Luddites} kept at their craft
and thankfully handmade lacemaking survived on a much
smaller scale still being passed down from
mother to daughter.

Lacemakers today still use these same ethereal techniques of sewing with silk, cotton or linen threads wound onto bobbins.
Pins are set out in specific patterns on a pillow and from there
the seamstress embroiders in very specific knots and twists.
This technique of creating stretchers, flowers and padded areas
created magnificent 3-D quality pictures which are almost
unheard of in today’s modern world.


I once read that a good day’s work was finishing a
1″ x 1″ square of lace in an 8 hour day…

Another of my little napkins used as a placemat… 🙂
Sharing with
Feathered Nest Friday ~ French Country Cottage
Thursday Favorite Things ~ Follow the Yellow Brick Home
Sweet Inspiration ~ The Boondock’s Blog
Wow ~ Savvy Southern Style
Thursday Favorite Things {following week, Lol!}
Keep In Touch ~ Let’s Add Sprinkles

An update:
This post was featured at
Thursday Favorite Things ~ Petite Haus


An update ~ here are a couple of books you might like that go along with this post:












Just a little fun lace history for you!
Hugs,
Uncategorized

Happy Mother’s Day!

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Mother’s Day  is always a wonderful holiday and it is especially wonderful this year as my grown children
came down {and up!} to visit me and my husband
this past weekend!


Mom and Amy grabbing a selfie!  We don’t look alike at all, do we?  Lol!


We enjoyed a trip to Magnolia Market as our daughter Amy and our son Peter and daughter-in-law Justine enjoyed their first visit to the market even though it was a crazy rainy day!

You can see a little more from our trip on my Instagram
posts here and here.

Justine and Peter out with Peter Rabbit in our little glamper garden.

We had a good time eating out and taking a tour
of Sanger and Waco ~ lots of fun!
Even got to skip some stones.
🙂


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So… this year’s Mother’s Day post is a mishmash
collection of photographs I’ve taken.
This past fall or winter I shot some photographs of this lovely Mother’s Day napkin
I have owned for many years now.
I found it rummaging through some baskets I have
stored under our bed and thought that it would
make a fun future post!


Then too I found this photograph of our former big house
garden and I loved adding this poem to it.
It’s random but it works with all of the things and people
I love and it speak to me about love and
Mother’s Day.
😉

One of the first photographs I took for my blog back in the day.  I was still learning how to use the camera lighting, too.
This one too with some of my favorite linens packed away
and still in storage waiting to come back out to play
speaks to me of the many other women who
enjoyed these lovely lacy beauties before me.

I wonder how many of these tablecloths and napkins
graced someone else’s Mother’s Day table
before mine?

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Mother’s Day  of course makes me think of
my mother and how I wish she and my father had lived
longer so they could have known the kids better.
Ginny and Gene on their wedding day ~ September 1959.
I’ve been on my ancestry account this week and it’s fun to see the continuity of family genes on my ancestors’ faces ~  for
those relatives that we have photographs.
😉

A lovely photograph I took before church one day of my MIL Gini Chapman.
Here are my mother-in-law and father-in-law
with Charles’ grandfather and grandmother
in the late 1970’s ~ Raymond and Kate.

Raymond and Kate {she’s from Farmersville, Texas!}, Gini and Pete {my FIL), and Charles and sister Jodi ~ who just
graduated magna cum laude with her master’s degree this weekend at Ashland University, San Diego, California!!! 
I think I may have shared these two photos with
you all at some point and maybe in a post
to share them again!
🙂



It’s a comforting thing ~ like these linens
and even this silly little bowl of soup.
😉
My hubby Charles and our sweet Amy!


*Sharing more about my mom and dad here.
🙂

















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From my family  to yours ~
Have a great Mother’s Day!
Uncategorized

How to Make a French Toile Tablecloth ~ Part 2

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Last time  we left off at shiplap joining the middle seam
between the two halves of this tablecloth and today
we will work on finishing it!
🙂


How to Piece together Toile (cont.)

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Once   the seam is joined flip the fabric over to the
wrong side and press towards either the right or left.
Here I’ve pressed my seam left {very top of photo}.

*Here’s the link to Part 1.
🙂




Turn right side up and top stitch close to the main seam.
{Shown here on the right side of this photograph.}

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Turn wrong side up again and *grade the seam allowance then roll the top piece of fabric underneath.
Press again.
{Lower part of the photo.}
🙂
*Grading a seam allowance takes out the bulk taking the bottom selvage piece
down to 3/8″ and the upper 5/8″ selvage can then wrap around it easily.
This creates nicely finished seams with no frayed edges showing.


Turn the fabric right side up one final time and topstitch
1/4″ from the first topstitching.
{Shown on the left side of the above photograph;
I was doing two things at once in these photos ~
hence why I’m sharing both pics twice.}

Sizing your tablecloth into a square


Take your cloth and lay on a table or on the floor right side up.
Fold the cloth horizontally and matching the sewn seam ~
making the uncut top and bottom pieces meet up
at the shorter lengths.

Here the fabric is folded horizontally matching the vertical seam stacked on top of each other ~
shown on the very left edge of the table above.

Now cut off the extra fabric that extends beyond like the
photograph below:
The extra fabric from the top and bottom are cut away {here folded over ready to cut away}.

 Once the extra fabric is removed from the top and bottom
measure the height of the tablecloth.
This gives you your final measurement for what to cut
from the sides of the tablecloth.


You can cut this square two different ways

1) Measure from top to bottom ~ this is the measurement you
will divide and mark for the side seams beginning
horizontally from the center of the seam to each side.

Mark the measurements outward from the seam ~ one set at the
top and one at the bottom of the left and right halves
of the tablecloth.
On mine I measured 31″ on the left side and another 31″
on the right side.

Draw a line from top to bottom on the left and again on
the right sides and cut off this extra fabric.




2) A different and less measuring intensive way to do this
is by folding the fabric on top of a large table or the floor
into a large rectangle.

Do this by first folding horizontally aligning the vertical seam
as before when removing the extra top and bottom fabric.
Finger press the seam as the photograph shows above.

Then fold the fabric left side across to the right side ~ there
will be a little less on the top side with the fold
but then you’ll cut off a little more from the bottom piece
{as shown in the next photograph where the top piece
is lifted up}.
This creates “the square” as you can see in the above
photograph.

Now measure the amount need to cut off on the sides; remove.
This second way is really faster as the large mass of fabric
is in a smaller size and easier to deal with.
The resulting large piece is a nice square without
the hassle of laying out lines and possible mistakes.
🙂
My ruffle inspiration ~ this Shabby Chic tablecloth.  I love the ruffles’ seam showing on the outside!


Making a Ruffle

If you’d like to create a ruffle for your French toile de Jouy tablecloth, begin with measuring the area of your “square.”

Mine at 62″ x 62″ square {31″ left and right halves plus the same vertically}:
Area = length x 4 or 62 + 62 + 62 + 62″ = 248″
Yours may be different.

Ruffles are usually 1.5x – 2x the area in length
so this tablecloth’s area doubled would be 496″.

When I went back to the store to buy more fabric there
was only 1.75 yards, so I divided 45″ width into 496″ and
this boiled down to a ruffle width of 5.75″ for each piece.
6 pieces could be cut out of 36″/1 yard of fabric.
I was able to cut 10 widths.

Seam these together at each end, all figures facing the correct
way and making one long piece.

Fold under the top 3/4″ and press along this top edge from
the wrong side of the fabric.

Double turn under the lower edge, press and sew this
bottom seam.
{I chose to do this later.  I’m sorry I didn’t take any
photographs at this stage for you!  🙁  }

The ruffle is ready to pin onto the tablecloth edges.
Begin by figuring out how many pieces will fit on a side ~
mine with 10 pieces/4 sides = 2.5 pieces per side.
Pin one edge from the left corner and count the pieces and pin
to the next corner.

Pull the fabric from the very middle of the ruffle and pin
to the middle of this tablecloth edge.
Keep halving the pieces over and over until it is all pinned.

Move to the next side and repeat.

For more detailed photographs click here in the post
I wrote last summer when making our chair covers.
Here you can see the beginning of the pinning.
Sneak peek at an upcoming table setting post…
Sew the seam with the ruffle edge to the outside and pull
pins as you go.
This does take some time but once you get the first seam in
if you want to a second seam can be added like in
the inspiration piece.
And that’s it!


Sharing with
Wow ~ Savvy Southern Style
Feathered Nest Friday
Create Bake Grow and Gather




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Until next time,
Uncategorized

Mixing the Old with the New ~ Shabby Chic Bedding

When we moved to Texas last fall
we brought just a couple of throws to wrap up in
while snuggling on our couch 
and our 
big down comforter knowing we would need it to 
keep warm during the coming winter.

No special linens or comforters 
came with us
not even 
my favorite old duvet cover as there
just really wasn’t room.
Yesterday I remedied that hole in our
sorely needed bed linens…




I love all of Rachel Ashwell’s Shabby Chic for Target linens!  The white pillowcase and sheets are hers as are the rose strewn
pillow sham from a comforter set we have and also the duvet cover.  The latter two are older linens from past SC years.


When I flew back to California for the 
Design Bloggers Conference
in March of this year,
I went by our storage units after the conference and 
started quickly going through our 1880’s reproduction
Louis XV French armoire.
{which we smartly placed at the very front left of Storage Unit #1}


This European walnut parquet veneer armoire has
four adjustable shelves which sit on four notched-out
corner pieces in each corner of the upper cabinet.  An
inner drawer is lovely for holding scarves, gloves and
other lingerie when this cabinet is used as a wardrobe.
It also has an amply large drawer down in the bottom
section in between cabriole legs ~ perfect for separat-
ing sheets and pillowcases from blankets and large
items stored behind the main cabinet’s
beveled glass door.






















Looking at all of our bed linens and also
the pillows I like to put out at Christmas time
then deciding 
yet again 
what did we really need right now
and
what could wait and stay in storage 
until we moved
everything else into to Texas and
a future house.


A favorite portrait of Yoda, our Peke, atop our reversible duvet ~ large print on this side and a much smaller all-over rose
print on the reverse.  Photo taken with either my old iPhone 4 or just set really grainy when I was still getting to know
our Canon EOS Rebel SL1.    🙂
And you bet I sent home that 
favorite duvet cover!
{which has a cream background but is looking kinda of 
pink in the photograph, top right, but looks true above with Mr. Scump!}
😉


The two little fairies who traveled beautifully wrapped in pillowcases
then packed into an unused Tupperware box I would need in the new
fifth-wheel’s kitchen.
After packing these linens into FedEx boxes I’d 
picked up the day before at the shipper,
I also sent home some extra pillow cases wrapped 
around just a few decorations to put out on display to cozy
up the insides of our new “Little Home.”


Which leads us to yesterday’s happy purchase ~
a new lavender and roses summer quilt
new to the
Simply Shabby Chic
line at Target called 
Purple Berry Rose.

{The cups above are part of last year’s SSC line
and I love having them in my new kitchen!}





I’m really excited to have new bedding
a little more summery
a little more ethereal 
and in the
quiet pastel tones that 
I love!

This lavender is really a soft hue
but still packs a punch with its
darker pink roses
and
I love how all Shabby Chic pieces
play well with each other!

*I was not compensated for this post ~ I just have been in-love with SCC linens
since I first began collecting pieces around 15 to 20 years ago now.
🙂

Sometimes just a little change
brings a whole new look!
Happy weekend!

Sharing with
Fridays at the Firehouse ~ A Fireman’s Wife
Sweet Inspiration ~ The Boondocks Blog
Share Your Style ~ The Red Painted Cottage




Uncategorized

Happy Friday ~ A Quick Post

Happy Friday and the beginning to a
lovely fall weekend!

Just a quick post to say hello and to
to say that I’ll be finishing up a big project 
I am working on this weekend.
{naturally, don’t all of us do this just before a Big Move??}
😉


I’ll let you in on a little secret…
It’s my version of a 
Halloween party harvest table
out for you early next week.
Enjoy your weekend!
Barb 🙂

Uncategorized

A Little Toile de Jouy Fall Table Styling

I love it when an idea leads 
naturally into the next
as this little toile de jouy fall table~styling 
came about 
just this way!

I love dressing a beautiful table
and creating those
Super Easy Toile de Jouy Pumpkins
were the inspiration…

A light breeze was blowing and the 
golden glow
from the sun sitting low in the sky created a 
piece of France 
in my own front yard.
 A folding table draped with lace
became a stage 
as favorite white dessert plates became
characters in this play. 
Purple Tupperware plates 
took on the supporting role as chargers
along with the
turquoise Tupperware glasses.

Sweet gilded acorns found at
HomeGoods
scattered here and there
along with a few candles
almost completed the scene.
Toile once again makes its appearance
in a third act with the 
blue toile
coming out stage right
as simple napkins tied gently
with the same lace used to 
make the red toile pumpkin.

The toile pumpkin proudly sits front and center
at the head of the table
with an overflowing basket of dried blooms.

Our lovely lady ~ one of my “Girls” ~ 
came to the show
dressed in her finest.

And of course
chocolate is always a welcome
attendee!

All the world’s a stage
Didn’t Shakespeare say that?
Our setting here would certainly agree!
I hope you have enjoyed this little
table styling show.
🙂
Thank you for stopping by and I hope you’ll drop by
next week as we wander to some places we visited on our 
14 state driving tour this summer
but haven’t been 
shared here with you yet.
We will begin with visiting the 
Great State of Texas.
As always I’d love it if you’d share!!!


Blessings to you,
Uncategorized

Super Easy Fabric Pumpkins using Leftover Fabrics

Good morning, Everybody!
Out on the Internet right now
 Fall Crafts are just
well…
falling like leaves!
and
seeing all these wonderful ideas got me excited
to try and make a few fabric pumpkins
of my own
to share with you!
🙂



Designing something totally from scratch
isn’t always something that I can just do
however that being said
I am really good at taking an idea
and running with it!
It popped into my head late last week
{after I’d been out on Pinterest pinning away}
that one of my favorite fabrics might make a
unique soft pumpkin ~
something a little different than
what others have created…

Most of my fabric is packed away however

I bought this French Blue Toile recently
to create a new 
Dog Bed Cover
for our Pekingese Yoda
so I had a bunch of fabric leftover.
I also had purchased a red toile and
decided to use that fabric, too.
I do like the oranges and reds and browns
and gold colors of fall
but
I’m really more of a soft summer colors
kinda gal and that’s why I chose these colors.

I began seeing all those precious pumpkins
out on other blog sites and there on Pinterest.
I saw pretty pumpkins made out of burlap
and luxuriously soft pumpkins
made out of velveteen
and that’s what gave me the idea to make
these
Toile de Jouy 
fabric pumpkins.


I had also seen some fabric pumpkins
over on internet friend
Janet Coon’s Pinterest page
which she had made for her shop several years ago
created out of pink chenille with pink yarn tied
around the stems…
soooo cute!
You’ll have to check them out under her Pinterest site
or under my Pinterest site in my Holiday section
at:
Holidays
{Here is a link to her actual blog ~ thought you’d like to see this, too!}
Shabbyfufu.


Super Easy 
Fabric Pumpkins

Directions:

* Cut out a rectangle {or circle} of fabric to the size you’d like ~
you may want to pre~fold up the fabric to judge approximately
how large the pumpkin will be when stuffed and sewn ~
in case you want to resize BEFORE cutting the fabric.

Just and FYI…
**The red toile ended up being too tall, so I cut some off
and that became the smallest pumpkin.
**The blue toile pumpkin was created with a wider width
to begin with than the red one. 
😉

* Turn fabric right~side in and sew one end and the side
closed if creating a pumpkin from a rectangle of fabric
otherwise
sew around the outer edge of the circle and 
bring up this running stitch.
Trim seam allowances as needed.

*Using a 6″ doll/craft needle {which has a really large eye} ~ thread with whatever material/thread/jute string you’d like sew around the outer circle to create the top. **For these I ended up just sewing the cording to the top and bottom with a smaller upholstery needle as the jute was wrapped on and pulled taught.
The photograph to the left shows the crazy
crossing of the jute cording.  Happily this was covered by lace afterwards.  {The large doll needle I have is in storage somewhere…}
The photograph above shows the bottom of the red toile pumpkin
and how the jute cording was crossed and was sewn to the fabric.

*Stuff with polyester fluff material or leftover
fabric pieces and sew closed.

*Hot glue in a real dried pumpkin stem or any
cut piece of branch, dowel, etc.

I went on a walk with Hubby and Yoda and
found this nice branch early this evening!
A couple of quick cuts later the “stem” for
the blue toile pumpkin was ready.

Gorgeous setting sun as these photos were shot last evening.

* After finishing closing the top of your pumpkin,
decorate with ribbons, jewelry pieces, and lace 

to your heart’s content!


Hope you have enjoyed this fall pumpkin craft tutorial!
As always, feel free to share.
Also, I’d love it if you’d “follow along!”  
Have a wonderful 
rest of your week!
I’m going to sign off now and 
go make a few more.

Happy fall, ya’ll!
*Update
Related stories where these pumpkins
featured are here and here.
🙂
Sharing with:
Create Link Inspire ~ The Crafty Blogstalker
http://thecraftyblogstalker.com/create-link-inspire-linky-party-148/

Wow Us Wednesdays ~ Savvy Southern Style
http://www.savvysouthernstyle.net/2016/09/wow-us-wednesdays-293.html#more

Feathered Nest Friday ~ French Country Cottage
http://www.frenchcountrycottage.net/
Uncategorized

Crafts to Make ~ French Toile de Jouy Dog Bed Cover

Yoda testing out his new bed cover last night after it was just completed!  He approved! 

With the tiniest hint of fall 
in the early morning air
and 
grocery stores beginning to put out their 
fall produce for sale 
along with all of the seasonal 
berry pies 
This year’s crop of gourds and pumpkins
should be coming in just around the corner…
With this, I’m feeling
energized and ready 
for a little fall cleaning
plus I’m feeling a little
sewing bug coming on!

My “sewing table”
I’ve have a list of simple projects
I want to get done for our
Tiny House this fall 
and 
one of these projects includes something for
our little dog 
Yoda.

Laying out the fabric over the current insert ~ rough-measuring leaving an inch over beyond each edge for the seam allowance ~ past the sides’ midpoints ~ where the top and bottom are sewed together.


Yoda’s dog bed has been
in need of some 
TLC
for quite some time…

We found his dog bed
about ten years ago at

Target
when we first picked him up from the
Animal Friends of the Valley 
Animal Shelter
in Lake Elsinore ~
not too far from
where we were
living in our Big House.

Yoda snoozing during our trip across country this summer.

The main body
is still holding up
and
 I haven’t found anything like this
with which to replace it
so…
I thought I’d make him a new padded inside piece
to sleep on
as the current one is flat and bunching up
when washed… a lot…

But first I wanted to make
the cute outside cover
and
I’m heading back to my
French Ethereal roots
using this really pretty
100% cotton dusky aquamarine blue
toile de jouy fabric 
I found recently while browsing the
craft section at
Wal-Mart.


Just like eating your favorite dessert 
before dinner ~
it’s loads more fun to make
the finished cover first!
And I will go back later and make
a new insert with muslin and new stuffing,
but for now
I had to make this cover!
I am loving this fabric!!!
Oo la la!


Here you can see how I draped the fabric 
over the insert and didn’t pull it taught but 
let it “fall” into the padded area.
This creates the extra needed 
seam allowance and “give”
to later stuff with a new insert.
I sewed a normal 5/8″ seam allowance
around the dog bed cover, then snipped every 
1/2″ or so around the curves to make the piece 
lay flat once turned and ironed.
Tools of the trade: embroidery scissors for snipping threads, quilter’s pins {I like these ever so much better than those short pins we all grew up with for sewing!}, various scissors {I can’t locate my good Ginghers… 🙁 }, and a small box I like to keep my seam rippers and sewing machine dusting brush in.  I think there’s a small Exacto knife in there, too. 🙂

Day Two {rather Evening 2}

I debated about how to close this cover
and decided to use buttons
as I’d like to be able to whip this doggy bed cover off
to the laundry whenever it is in need 
of a washing.
😉

So, I added an extra piece of fabric to the bottom piece’s 

seam allowance, right sides together. Then, after sewing up the side 
edges equal with the opening’s size, I reversed the “pocket” 
now~created then folding under its remaining raw edge over the 
original seam which was then stitched closed.  This will
become the part where I will sew the buttons.  
This whole piece will be unseen once flipped 
inside.   The top piece will get button holes once I know
what size buttons I am using.  For now, Yoda get a 
free~flapping bed cover!

Trés Magnifique! 
And there you have it…
A not too difficult dog bed cover 
that is contemporary
and classic…
and so much more 
suits my 
Shabby French Style!

Have a great Monday,
and let me know what fall projects
you are working on!

Blessings to you,
Barb 🙂



Sharing with ~
Create Link Inspire ~ The Crafty Blog Stalker
WOW Us Wednesdays ~ Savvy Southern Style
Feathered Nest Friday ~ French Country Cottage



Uncategorized

White and Silver Daydreams…

Tea, cake and scones ~ a study in whites and creams… {sigh!} 

White and Silver…
Some of my most favorite colors…

Today’s post sharing some past
lovelies with you!!!


A few of the ecru and white lace napkins, a table runner and an
Irish tablecloth {far right, bottom} picked up in England. Shot when
I was still learning how to use the aperature on our camera to let in light. 😉



Do you ever feel the need to

just daydream?
Bringing out my favorite pieces of china and 
those lacy linens
and just the act of decorating our tables
{whether they are big or small},
set me off daydreaming…
Great for decompressing from life’s trials and also
just because it’s a lot of fun to decorate
with all that china!
I feel that need a lot.
Do you??
😉

A few of my favorite pieces… found at various thrift stores, flea markets, and
antique shops.  Most of my silver-plate pieces are
1847 Rogers Bros. ~ Remembrance pattern ~ above, far right
We usually have a few get-togethers
over the summer with family and friends.
Our daughter’s birthday starts the summer parties
here in June and in the past
we always had her school friends over
for a cookout and to swim
then to eat cupcakes or cake
depending upon the birthday girl’s wishes 
each particular year.
Our son’s birthday is just on Labor Day weekend,
so his birthdays were always a little quieter
with just a couple of friends over
for a sleepover and swimming,
movies all night, and more cake and ice cream.
It was always rather nice having their birthdays
as bookends to the summer season!



For this summer, I’m making plans
 to invite a few of my friends over for tea…
Okay, it’s always 
my favorite thing to do I admit
but even with the tea craze 
having come and gone
I feel there is always a place
for a good tea and fellowship with friends.
🙂

A favorite photo of a tea at friend Kathy’s former home with all of us from our tea group.
This was taken nine years ago now! My how time flies!


I haven’t really had anyone 
over to our new place as last fall was simply too crazy 
moving every couple of weeks to new locations among the campsites as we took on our camp host positions, 
then, winter was windy and freezing 
{no outdoor entertaining for us!},
and we have just been too busy
this spring with track season.
But
now summer is here!!!
and
the weather is balmy, 
the afternoon coastal breezes soft and cooling,
and lovely trees providing the 
necessary afternoon shade ~
just perfect to invite some guests over 
to see our new digs and experience 
all that this area has to offer!





One tea I have planned is for the friends 
I’ve known for many years now and met 
through the 
Victorian Tea Society
and
The second is a party for my new friends
met while working here at The Lake!
🙂 


The photograph just above 
was taken after a tea when all the 
silverware was sparkling 
in the late afternoon light.
A favorite time of day to daydream is when 
I’m making
all that china and silver 
*sparkle*
with a good cleaning!



Our powder room downstairs at our Big House. ~ dressed for company!



Did you know that one of my favorite things 
to do after giving a tea for friends 
is to wash up all of the 
tea luncheon’s dishes and all of the silverplate 
while listening to music and 
watching birds 
peck seeds at the bird feeders outside?


I still do that here at our Tiny House, 
now I just have to turn around and 
sip a cup of tea while peering out the 
sitting area window.
Is birdwatching a favorite for you, too??


A favorite setting with the rose plates and bowls brought back from England along with my
great~grandmother’s crystal bowl passed down to the daughters. My daughter will be the
fifth generation to have it grace her tables! 


The lake here attracts so many species of birds
than we ever had at our bird feeders back in Murrieta!
Juncos, towhees (really large brown birds with barrel tummies!), 
field and Nevada sparrows, blackbirds, 
crows, ravens (so enormous and they love sunflower seeds!).

I’m sorry I don’t have any good photographs 
of the towhees for you today.
They are rather shy birds and I’ll just 
have to be sneaky this summer and 
set up the camera the evening before
so I can nab pics early in the mornings
through our sitting area window!
😉


What kinds of birds are attracted 
to your backyard?
Let me know as I love hearing
about everyone’s feathered friends!
I hope you enjoy having them visit you.
(I know you do!)
😉

Pieces of a cake we had at the “Snowman Tea” I gave for friends a few years back.
I Love birds on china, too! 
This is a set of dessert plates I bring out each winter
to celebrate special occasions with
and also “just because days.”
You may have seen this set at the big stores like
Macy’s,
which is where I believe I bought a few of these 
at an after-Christmas sale.
Some came years later from
HomeGoods.
I would stack them in our cupboard and use them
myself for tea and muffins in the mornings
and for special dinners
with the family.
So pretty and fun for every occasion!
My daughter also likes to use them
for her breakfasts.
🙂
A cement piece I’ve had for many years ~ still looking to create something with it!
Anyway, Just a look back at some
“pretties” dressed in whites and silver  
from Our Home to Yours!

Please “Share”, “Like” and sign~up as a 
“French Ethereal Friend” if you’d like to receive more of my ramblings.
Thank you ever so much! 
Let me know what things interest you and
 things I could talk about or 
help you learn to do.

Blessings to you, always,
Sharing with ~
Feathered Nest Friday ~ French Country Cottage